Attractions

Inscription Walk at Scripps College

In 1994, a very special and significant pathway connects the W.M. Keck Science Center to the east side of the Scripps campus, near the President’s House, known as Revelle House. If you find this lovely walk when you explore Scripps College, you’ll be able to stroll and read quotes from famous and admired women in the Arts, Letters and Sciences. This venerated collection of beloved quotes was chosen by a committee of students, faculty and alumnae and include quotes from esteemed women in history such as:

 
Located directly south of the Presidents house (Revelle House) at Amherst Ave. and 9th Street:
Latitude and Longitude (34.104880, -117.710470)

GPS Coordinates 34° 6′ 17.568” N 117° 42′ 37.692” W

Scripps College is a private liberal arts women’s college in Claremont, California. Founded as a member of the Claremont Colleges in 1926. Journalist and philanthropist Ellen Browning Scripps provided its initial endowment.

The Venus Statue at Harvey Mudd College

The Venus Statue and Fountain located at Harvey Mudd College in Claremont is a beautiful, classic sculpture. Visitors will find it gracing Hixon Court, with the Sprague Library and the entrance to Galileo Hall just behind it. This incredible sculpture was brought to the city of Claremont from Italy by Thomas Church, who landscaped the Harvey Mudd campus. The Venus, often referred to as the Venus de Mudd, is a beloved sight on campus. This gorgeous goddess Venus was created by Giovanni Bologna (1552-1608), an Italian sculptor.

It was a time of naturalism, humanism and linear perspective, that cultivated a new change in art, knowledge, and culture, known as “The Renaissance”. The artist extracted beauty from nature and created something truly breathtaking with this piece. The Venus statue is a stunning symbol of the commitment and dedication towards learning. Dedicated students thrive from the humanities and social sciences programs at this engineering and scientific school.

The Flemish-Italian sculptor was one of the most important original 16th-century sculptors of the times. He executed several figures of the Venus, many for fountains. The Mannerist ideals of elongation and courtly elegance are present in her appearance.  He also achieved a sense of movement and balance in her form.

Harvey Mudd College is a private liberal arts college, founded in 1955 in Claremont, California, that awards the Bachelor of Science degree. Academic focus is on mathematics, the physical and biological sciences, and engineering. Harvey Mudd College is part of the consortium of Claremont Colleges. Whether you’re a Harvey Mudd College student or just visiting, be sure to take a moment to admire this incredible work of art! The Venus Statue is a place to feel zen and one with nature.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kravis Center at Claremont McKenna College (The Kube)

The Kravis Center, designed by world-renowned architect Rafael Viñoly, is a five-level, 162,000-sq-ft academic and administrative facility. It serves as a defining and unique piece of college campus architecture. The Center has offices, classrooms, seminar rooms, five research institutes, and underground parking. The grounds surrounding the building have water-features, courtyards and landscaped patios.

The most iconic space in the center is the “The Kube”, also known as the Living Room. It’s often full of students taking advantage of the tranquil atmosphere to catch up on reading or get ahead on their coursework. The Living Room’s popularity is a testament to the importance of having quiet spaces on campus. It’s here that students can go to focus and escape the hustle and bustle of academic life. The open design and all-glass exterior of “The Kube” is suspended above a black granite reflecting pool and offers unbeatable panoramas of the campus.

The Living Room is more than just a peaceful place to take in the view. It’s also LEED Gold certified, which means it meets strict environmental standards for energy efficiency and sustainability. In addition, with its LEED Gold certification, the Center sets a high standard for environmental responsibility. The Kravis Center, featuring exemplary college campus architecture, like the Living Room, shows that sustainable design can be beautiful and functional.

 If you’re looking for some incredible architecture, “The Kube” is of notable architectural design.  It’s located on the Claremont McKenna College campus and is a must-see place of interest when you visit.

 

 

 

 

 

Bridges Hall of Music (Little Bridges)

Mabel Shaw Bridges Hall of Music, this 550-seat gem of a concert hall better known as “Little Bridges,” sits within the beautiful grounds of Pomona College on Fourth Street just east of College Avenue. Each year, from September through May, the College sponsors a broad spectrum of nearly 45 concerts encompassing classical, jazz, folk, Western and non-Western music. The performances, which are traditionally free of charge, are open to the campus and surrounding communities.

John R. Rodman Arboretum (Pitzer College)

Since 1988, the Arboretum has been an official part of Pitzer College. The operating commonality among the Arboretum gardens, spread throughout the campus, is that drought-tolerant and native landscaping can produce not only a beautiful and welcoming, but environmentally responsible setting for a college located in the San Gabriel alluvial scrub country of Southern California.

Find the origins of arboretum on the northeast corner of campus, adjacent to the Brant Clock Tower and surrounding The Grove House. 

Sontag Greek Theatre

Located on the Pomona College campus, this secluded, outdoor amphitheater is home to the Midsummer Shakespeare Festival.

Bridges Auditorium

The Mabel Shaw Bridges Music Auditorium at Pomona College was built in 1931 at a cost of $600,000. It opened in 1932 with Artur Rodzinski conducting the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra, a performance that led to a continuing association between the orchestra and The Claremont Colleges.

The auditorium was designed by architect William Templeton Johnson. Conceptually, it is as a free adaptation of Northern Italian Renaissance architecture. Its great white columns, vaulting arches and massive wooden doors provide an imposing entrance. The foyer is grand but warm with soft lights, hand-painted coffered ceiling and Carrara marble columns. Giovanni (John) Smeraldi’s 22,000-square-foot ceiling depicts the signs of the zodiac in blue, silver and gold, and rises 55 feet above the auditorium floor spanning 120 feet with no inside supports.

The auditorium has some 60,000 square feet of inside floor space, 14,000 square feet of porches and walks, and a 90-by-40-foot stage with 62-foot proscenium opening. Current seating accommodates about 2,494 people.

Chris Burden’s “Meet in the Middle” at Roberts Pavilion

Chris Burden’s “Meet in the Middle,” installed in the plaza in front of Roberts Pavilion, allows students to interact with the artwork. The installation of eight street lamps and 24 benches is an homage to Burden’s “Urban Light” sculpture installation of 202 vintage street lamps at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery (Scripps College)

The Williamson Gallery is free and open to the public. The Gallery offers four exhibitions annually. While selected works from the permanent collection are displayed in exhibitions each year, the permanent collection is not on display. We are located in the courtyard adjacent to Eleventh St. and Columbia Ave., just north of the Baxter Building (Campus Security) at 251 E. Eleventh St., Claremont CA, 91711. Donations are welcome. For any questions, contact the Gallery offices at (909) 607-4690. We are open Wednesday–Sunday, 12–5 p.m. during exhibitions. The gallery is closed Monday and Tuesday and in between shows. Please check the gallery’s exhibition schedule for the dates of exhibitions. During Gallery hours, you may also call the Gallery directly at (909) 607-2029.

Claremont Heritage — The Garner House

The Garner House in Memorial Park is home to Claremont Heritage. Herman and Bess Garner built the Spanish Colonial Revival house in 1926 and lived here with their three sons for many years. At the time with 5,000 square feet, the home was one of the largest residences in town with exemplary wrought ironwork, oak and cork flooring and a complex, interesting floor plan. Under the care of Claremont Heritage, the house has become the city’s center for historic programs.

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